College of Agriculture, Bhubaneswar

About the College:
The College of Agriculture was established in 1954 under the administrative control of the State Government and affiliated to the Utkal University. It came to the administrative control of Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology located at State Capital, Bhubaneswar in the year 1962. The primary function of the college is teaching at the UG and PG leading to B.Sc. (Ag.), M.Sc. (Ag.) and Ph. D. degrees. Nevertheless, it also undertakes research and extension activities in various fields as and when required.
Facilities:

  1. Study in agriculture at Undergraduate level leading to B.Sc. (Hons.) Agriculture degree.
  2. Study in Post Graduate level leading to M.Sc. (Ag.) and Ph.D. degrees.
  • Basic and applied research on various subjects of agriculture.
  1. Central Laboratory facilities and Tissue Culture-cum-Biotechnology Centre for conducting advanced research on agriculture.
  2. A Central farm for conducting field research on various aspects of applied agricultural research.
  3. Extension activities concerned with various aspects of agriculture.
  • Excellent library facilities with e-connectivity to hostels and all departments of agriculture.
  • Very good residential hostel facilities for boys and girls separately.
  1. Medical and ambulance facilities for all students and staff members.
  2. Presence of very good sports complex comprising football, volley ball, cricket, hockey ground, Kho-Kho, badminton court, basket ball court as well as gymnastic facilities for the students and staff members.

Department-wise Laboratories available for research work

Sl.No.

Departments

Name of laboratories

1

Soil Science & Agril. Chemistry

Advanced Analytical Lab. on Niche Area of Excellence on Acid Soil Management

 

        -do-

Microbiology Laboratory

2

Plant Physiology

Plant Physiology Laboratory

3

Entomology

Bio-control Laboratory

4

Ag. Bio-technology

Tissue Culture Laboratory

5

Seed Science & Technology

G.V. Chalam Seed Technology Laboratory

6

Plant Breeding & Genetics

Sinha Molecular Laboratory

7

Extension Education

Audio Visual Laboratory

8

Agronomy

IRRI-OUAT Collaborative Analytical Lab

9

Dean, CA

Bio-technology-cum-Tissue Culture Centre

 
Selection for Admission (Admission Policy)
                                   

  1. Basis for Admission

Particulars of Examination

UG

PG

Ph.D.

Qualifying Examination

Entrance Examination

The admission is made based on the score at the entrance examination and qualifying examination (+2 Science) and 10th School Certificate examination.

The admission is made based on the combined score of the entrance, 10th, +2 Science and B.Sc.(Ag.) examination

The admission is made based on the combined score of the entrance, 10th, +2 Science, B.Sc. (Ag.) and M. Sc .(Ag.) examination.

 
12.5     Student Reservation (Per cent)

Category

UG

PG

 

No

%

No

%

General

118

61

78

52

SC

15

08

12

08

ST

23

12

18

12

GCH

06

03

05

03

Farmer’s ward/PH disabled

03

02

 

 

Others (Specify) ICAR

 
17

 
09

 
37

 
25

 
 
Departments:
The Faculty of Agriculture comprises of 16 Departments viz., Agronomy, Agro-meteorology, Agricultural Statistics, Agricultural Bio-technology, Agricultural Economics, Extension Education, Entomology, Plant Pathology, Nematology, Plant Physiology, Plant Breeding & Genetics, Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry, Seed Science & Technology, Vegetable Science, Fruit Science & Technology and Floriculture & Landscaping. Out of which Ph. D. degrees are offered in 14 departments except Agricultural Statistics and Agro-meteorology. All the 16 departments offer PG and UG courses.
 
 
 
Details of Under Graduate and Post Graduate Programmes in the College:

Department

Academic Programmes

Year Started

Approved Seats
(2016-17)

Seats filled up

College of Agriculture

B.Sc. (Ag.)

1954

192

192

Agronomy

UG
M.Sc. (Ag.)
Ph.D.

1954
1960
1982

-
15
04

 

Agril. Meteorology

UG
M.Sc. (Ag.)

2011
2011

-
10

 

Agril. Statistics

UG
M.Sc. (Ag.)

1972
1982

-
10

 

Agril. Extension

UG
M.Sc. (Ag.)
Ph.D.

1962
1967
1999

-
15
04

 

Agril.Economics

UG
M.Sc. (Ag.)
Ph.D.

-
1960
1982

-
10
04

 

Agril. Bio-technology

UG
M.Sc. (Ag.)
Ph.D.

2002
2002
2002

-
10
02

 

Entomology

UG
M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

1954
1963
1982

-
15
04

 

Floriculture & Landscaping

M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

2009
2009

10
04

 

Fruit Science & Hort. Technology

M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

2009
2009

10
04

 

Nematology

UG
M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

1972
1972
1999

-
10
04

 

Plant Physiology

UG
M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

1972
1972
1999

-
10
04

 

Plant Pathology

UG
M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

1954
1963
1982

-
15
04

 

Plant Breeding & Genetics

UG
M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

1954
1961
1982

-
15
04

 

Seed Science & Technology

UG
M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

1982
2002
2009

-
10
02

 

Soil Science & Agril.Chemistry

UG
M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

1954
1964
1982

-
15
04

 

Vegetable Science

M.Sc.(Ag.)
Ph.D.

2009
2009

10
04

 

 
Research Achievements:
The Faculty members of the college are actively engaged in student’s research programmes. Besides, they are also engaged in conducting depository project trials and ad-hoc projects. Various Crop Improvement, Crop Production and Crop Protection practices have been developed through student and departmental research. The findings are being incorporated in Training Manual of the Department of Agriculture and Horticulture from time to time. Some of the salient findings developed during last five years have been highlighted below.
Crop Improvement:

  1. Varieties released: 18

Rice(7)                        :           Tanmayee, Hiranmayee, Jyotirmayee, Nua Acharmati,          Asutosh, Gobinda, Hasanta.
Fingermillet (1)           :           Kalua
Blackgram(1)              :           Mahuri
Sugarcane(2)               :           Raghunath, Nilachakra
Mustard(1)                  :           Sushree (ORT(M) 7-2)
Sesame(2)                    :           Smarak, Subhra
Linseed(1)                   :           Arpita
Arhar(Hyb)(1)             :           Parbati
Mesta(1)                      :           Shanti (JBM 71)
Jute(1)                         :           Shresthaa (KJC 7)
 

  • Two OR rice cultures (Pradeep & Prativa) have been proposed for release during 2016.

 
Crop Production:

  • Integrated nutrient management of RDF (30-15-15 kg N, P2O5, K2O/ha) + FYM @ 5 t/ha or RDF (30-15-15 kg N, P2O5, K2O/ha) + S-21 kg/ha +ZnSO4, 25 kg/ha + B 1 kg/ha + Azotobacter seed inoculation may be recommended for cv. ‘Uma’, ‘Prachi’ or ‘Nirmala’ during summer season to realize a seed yield of 811 & 829 kg/ha in a slightly acidic sandy loam soil in coastal Odisha.
  • Application of 3 irrigations at 2 days after sowing, 25 DAS & 50 DAS with 60-30-30 kg N- P2O5-K2O, 21 kg S, 25 kg ZnSO4 and 1.0 kg B per hectare produced mustard seed yield of 1366 kg/ha.  The crop fetched a net return of Rs. 22,476 with B-C ratio of 1.56.  Seed treatment with Azotobacter, application of 5 t FYM, 25 kg S and 1.0 kg B increased net returns by Rs. 2656, 3373, 6418 and 2182/ha, respectively when used alone with recommended dose of fertilizers.
  • Site Specific Nutrient Management (SSNM) treatments with N (150), P2O5 (100), K2O (80), S (40), B (5) and Zn (25) kg/ha in kharif and N (150), P2O5 (100), K2O (80) in rabi was the most sustainable for rice-rice cropping system with hybrid rice ‘PHB-71’.  However, the farmer’s practice applied with N (60), P2O5 (30) and K2O (30) kg/ha both during kharif and rabi was most nutrient efficient, production efficient, energy intensive and profitable rice-rice cropping system in irrigated lateritic soils of coastal Odisha for a short period of time without consideration of sustainability. 
  • The 1.6 ha pond based IFS model in rainfed area gave rice equivalent yield (REY) of 28,081 kg/ha, net returns of Rs. 1,42,201/ha and B-C ratio of 1.82 compared to REY of 4188 kg/ha, net returns of Rs. 9522/ha and B-C ratio of 1.25 in conventional rice-green gram system. The IFS model provided 5461 kg grain of rice, 29,811 kg of onion, 443.6 kg fish, 1983 kg papaya, 1083 kg banana, 642 kg drumstick, 847 kg poultry meat, 901.2 kg paddy straw mushroom and 714.4 kg oyster mushroom to the farm family and recyclable by-products of 5940 kg paddy straw, 5000 kg tank silt, 2104 kg poultry excreta and 13,022 kg mushroom spent for recycling in the system and use as input by other units. The SYI and SVI values were 0.82 and 0.44, respectively, in pond based model as compared to 0.13 and 0.03 in conventional cropping system.
  • Omission of nitrogen fertiliser from the SSNM package in Groundnut grown in Alfisols yielded at par with the SSNM dose in soils low to medium in available N. This technology can reduce the cost of cultivation and improve soil health.
  •  Bio-inoculation of greengram with Rhizobium and seed treatment with sodium molybdate @10 g/25 kg seed increased the yield by 33% and amelioration of acid soil with PMS @ 0.2 LR by 23%.
  • Integration of organics with inorganic fertilizers increased fodder yield by 22.5%. Further integration of biofertilisers (Azotobacter, Azospirillum and PSB in 1:1:1) increased yield by another 22%. Soil amelioration with PMS @ 0.2LR has added advantage of 19.6%.
  • GIS and GPS based soil fertility maps have been prepared for five districts namely Cuttack, Puri, Dhenkanal, Nayagarh and Khurda.
  • A new method called “Simplified CaCl2-Ca (OH)2 equilibration Method” has been developed to determine the lime requirement of acid soils of Odisha. This method is rapid, less expensive and determines less lime requirement than the modified Woodruff buffer method, but is equivalent to the latter in producing the pod yield of groundnut.
  • Application of diatomaceous earth as source of silicon @ 600 and 750 kg/ha to maize and sugarcane crops and @150 kg/ha to rice crop grown in silicon deficient soils integrated with soil test based recommended doses of NPK fertilizers increased the economic yield of maize, sugarcane and rice crops by 35, 21 and 17 per cent over the yields of 4310 kg/ha, 206.7 t/ha and 3840 kg/ha due to 100% of the STD, respectively. Its application had positive influence on crop quality, nutrient recovery and post harvest soil properties specially cation exchange capacity.
  • Use of Calcium silicate @ 2 t/ha to rice crop grown in  silicon deficient soil increased the economic yield by 9 per cent compared to 3640 kg/ha due to application of soil test based dose of fertilizers. Silicon nutrient not only influenced grain yield but also decreased grain: straw ratio, chaff production and recommendation of N, P & K by 8.1, 11.5 and 24.5 percent, respectively
  • Application of 75% RDF (100-50-60 kg NPK /ha) along with vermi compost @ 5t/ha and biofertilizers Azospirillum and PSB at 1:1 ratio @ 10 kg/ha resulted in maximum net returns of Rs.2,77,504 /ha with highest cost : benefit ratio in Gladiolus.
  • Application of  50% RDF ( 150-100-100 kg NPK/ha) in combination with FYM (10 t/ha) and biofertilizers (Azospirillum, Azotobacter  and PSB at 1:1:1 ratio) @ 10 kg/ha in Golden rod resulted in maximum net returns of Rs. 1,61,426 /ha with highest cost  benefit ratio of 3.87, which can be recommended to the flower growers in and around   Bhubaneswar as a healthy management practice for getting higher returns without  deteriorating  the  soil health.
  • Flower yield of jasmine can be increased by spraying MH @ 1000 ppm and NAA @ 50 ppm. Foliar spraying of ethrel @ 100 ppm induces early flowering and longer duration under Bhubaneswar condition
  • Five Asiatic hybrid Lilium varieties viz. New Wave, Orange Matrix, Alaska, Novcento and Monte Negro performed satisfactorily in both kharif and rabi However, plants grown under kharif season were earliest to appear flower bud, bud break and flowering. Besides, it also recorded maximum value for length of flowering shoot. On the other hand, plants grown in rabi season produced maximum number of flowers per shoot with significant improvement in length and width of flowers as well as length of flower stalk.
  • Parsley can be successfully cultivated in the coastal zone of Odisha with good quality.
  • Application of  5 tons of vermicompost, 6 kg of biofertilizer (Azotobacter : Azospirillum : PSB :: 1:1:1 ) along with  100% NPK ( 200:100:100 kg/ha for hybrids and 110:75:75 for  open pollinated varieties )  in  an integrated package produced highest fruit yield  of Okra.
  • Application of 75% of RDF (50:60:40) along with bio-fertilizer and vermi compost in presence of lime (PMS @ 5 t/ha)  improved the pod quality without  hampering the yield potentiality.
  • Application of 70:60:40 kg of NPK with FYM produced maximum leaf yield of 15.90 t/ha of coriander cv. ‘Super Mindori’.

 
Crop Protection:

  • In arhar, three sprays of spinosad 45%SC @ 0.5ml/L at 15 days interval starting at flowering stage of the crop was found effective in reducing the pod damage caused by borers with a benefit : cost ratio of 2.55:1.
  • Brinjal crop raised with 50% recommended dose of fertilizers + bio NPK and protected with six sprays of either carbosulfan 25 EC (@ 2 ml/L of water) or spinosad 45%SC (1ml/3L of water) at 10 days interval with initiation of first spray at 30 days after planting increased fruit yield to 139.3-167.26 q/ha as against 77.9 q/ha in untreated control.
  • Absconding and swarming in apiculture with Apis cerana indica can be reduced considerably by bottom board cleaning, regular and periodic dearth feeding with water: sugar solution (1:1) at a rate of 250 g/colony/week, removal of very old black combs and need based brood comb alteration.
  • Cyantraniliprole (Cyazypyr) 10% OD effectively controlled thrips, white fly, aphids, fruit borer (H. armigera), serpentine leaf miner and recorded highest fruit yield of tomato.
  • Etoxazole 10% SC (w/w) @ 40 g a.i. /ha may be recommended for the control of red spider mite, Tetranychu scinnabarinus population in brinjal crop whose efficacy was at par with its higher dose of 55 g a.i./ha.
  • RAB 55 (triflumezopyrim 10% SC) was superior to buprofezin 25% SC and thiomethoxam 25% WG against BPH and WBPH infesting rice. Application @ 25 g ai/ha was the best in terms of cost involvement, effectiveness and effect on natural enemies.
  • Plant extracts, such as extracts of bael leaf, ginger and turmeric rhizome and garlic bulb showed promising results in restricting bacterial growth on gel plates. The seed treatment with these plant extracts could reduce the abnormalities to 40% but none of them could perform better than streptocycline and hot water treatment.
  • Bael plant extract inhibited the mycelial growth of Aspergillus niger to the maximum (89.22%) followed by Tulsi (86.5 %) and neem (85.5%). Bio agent Pseudomonas fluorescens inhibited maximum mycelial growth (56.29%) of A.niger  in dual culture, but  culture filtrate of Trichoderma harzianum  exhibited a high degree of inhibition (91.6%) of test fungus at 50 % concentration. Chemical carbendazim 50% WP was most effective.
  • Mixing boiled wheat grains with 0.5% calcium carbonate and 2% calcium sulphate was superior to 2% calcium carbonate alone, which helped neutralizing the pH, absorption of excess moisture and easy filling into spawn bottles of paddy straw mushroom. Pre soaking of substrates for six hours recorded significantly the highest mushroom yield of 1.03 kg/bed (14.69% B.E.). Substrate soaking with 2.0% calcium carbonate solution resulted in early appearance of pin heads (8 days), highest number of fruiting bodies/bed (54.5) and yield (0.97 kg) with B.E. of 13.83 %. Application of indole acetic acid @ 200 ppm produced highest yield of mushroom (0.92 kg/ bed).
  • Spraying imidacloprid @ 3.0 ml/10L at 20, 30, 40 days after sowing or use of Neem Seed Kernel Extract @ 3 ml/L or use of yellow sticky trap in the field can check yellow mosaic virus disease of mung bean.
  • The biocontrol agent Bacillus subtilis was effective against Helminthosporium oryzae in laboratory condition. Propiconazole 0.1% followed by carbendazim + mancozeb (0.2%) were effective for management of brown spot disease of rice under field condition.
  • Cereal grains except wheat supported complete downward mycelial growth (110 mm) on paddy straw mushroom within 144 h of incubation. Paddy grain substrate could give the highest yield of 1.10 kg/bed followed by Bengal gram (1.07 kg/bed) with the corresponding biological efficiency of 14.95 and 14.47%, respectively.
  • Application of plant growth regulator Indole acetic acid (IAA) @ 200 ppm recorded the highest paddy straw mushroom yield of 1.08 kg/bed (15.40% BE) as against the control yield of 0.76 kg/bed with BE of 10.81%.
  • Soil application of Neem cake @ 1.5 t/ha reduced the population of root knot nematode in tuberose by 66.6 % in soil and 62.7 % in root and resulted in 138% increase in plant biomass over untreated check.
  • Application of Pseudomemass fluorescens @ 20 g/m2 in paddy nursery reduced population of root knot nematode by 49.8% in soil and 64.4% in root and increased grain yield of rice by 15.8% over untreated check.
  • Soil application of Trichoderma viride @ 2.5 kg/ha + Neem cake or Jatropha oil cake @ 100g/m2 decreased incidence of nematodes and increased yield of crops by 18.8-22.9% over check.
  • Application of carbofuran @ 0.75 kg a.i/ha along with liquid formulation of Bacillus subtilis @ 5 L/ha was the best cost effective IPM module against root knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita in turmeric resulting 40% reduction in nematode population with B : C ratio of 2.8 : 1.     
  • Application of sesame oil cake @ 1.5 t/ha + soil drenching of phosphonic acid 300 ppm was the best IDM module to combat quick wilt disease complex  (Meloidogyne incognita and Ralstonia solanacearum) in ginger causing 48% decrease in root knot nematode population in soil with B : C ratio of 3.16 : 1.    
  • Drenching with Bacillus subtilis @ 10 ml/L at transplanting of tomato seedlings significantly increased shoot length (19%), dry shoot weight (58%), dry root weight (43%) with significant reduction in number of  galls as well as egg masses to the tune of 62% over untreated check.

 
Events including Calendar:
 
Faculty Members in Position:

Department of Agronomy

1.      Dr.B.Behera, Professor & Head

2.      Dr. A.K.Mohapatra, Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr. G.C.Mishra, Professor (CAS)

4.      Dr.R.K.Paikaray, Professor (CAS)

5.      Dr.S.N.Jena, Associate Professor (CAS)

6.      Dr. M. R. Satpathy, Associate Professor (CAS)

7.      Dr.P.K.Mohanty  Associate Professor (CAS)

8.      Dr. S. Biswal, Associate Professor (CAS)

9.      Sri A.K.Behera, Asst. Prof.(SG)

10.  Mrs. A.Mohapatra, Asst. Prof.

Department of Agro-meteorology

1.      Dr.B.S.Rath, Professor and Head

2.      Dr. A.K.B Mohapatra, Associate Professor (CAS)

Department of Agricultural Biotechnology

1.      Prof. G. R. Rout, Professor and Head

2.      Prof. S. K. Tripathy, Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr. K. C. Samal, Associate Professor

4.      Dr. I. C. Mohanty, Associate Professor

Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics

1.      Dr. Bhabendra Baisakh, Professor and Head

2.      Dr. Bansidhar Pradhan, Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr. Debendranath Bastia, Associate Professor (CAS)

4.      Dr. Tapas Kumar Mishra, Professor

5.      Dr. Devraj Lenka, Associate Professor (CAS)

6.      Dr.(Mrs.) Jayashree Kar, Asst. Professor

7.      Dr. S.R. Das, Honourary Professor

Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry

1.      Dr.S.K.Pattanayak , Professor and Head

2.      Dr. G.H. Santra, Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr. S. Mohanty, Professor (CAS)

4.      Dr.A.K.Dash, Professor (IFFCO Chair)

5.      Dr.R.K.Patra, Professor (CAS)

6.      Dr. Narayan Panda, Assistant Professor

Department of Fruit Science and Technology

1.      Dr.D.K.Dash, Professor & Head

2.      Dr.S.C.Sahu. Associate Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr.S.N.Dash, Associate  Professor (CAS)
4.      Dr.C.M.Panda, Associate Professor (CAS)

Department of Vegetable Science

1.      Prof. Arun Kumar Das, Professor & Head

2.      Dr. Gouri Shankar Sahu, Associate Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr. Pradyumna Tripathy, Associate Professor (CAS)

Department of Floriculture and Landscaping

1.      Dr.(Mrs) Sashikala Beura, Head

2.      Mrs. Kaberi Maharana, Assistant  Professor

3.      Dr. (Mrs) Geeta Pandey, Assistant  Professor

Department of Entomology

1.      Dr.Santosh Kumar Panda, Professor  and Head

2.      Dr.Pratap Chandra Dash, Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr.Braja Kishore Sahoo, Professor (CAS)

4.      Dr.Hara Prasad Misra, Professor (CAS)

5.      Dr.Bhagaban Patro, Professor (CAS)

6.      Dr.Ladu Kishore Rath, Professor (CAS)

7.      Dr.Laxmi Narayan Mohapatra, Professor

8.      Dr.Prabhat Ranjan Mishra, Assoc. Professor (CAS)

9.      Dr.Pradeep Kumar Behera, Assoc. Professor (CAS)

10.  Dr. S.M.Abdulla Mandal, Assoc. Professor (CAS)

11.  Dr.Jayraj Padhi, Assoc. Professor (CAS)

Department of Plant Pathology

1.      Dr. (Mrs) N. NAYAK, Prof. and Head

2.      Dr K.B.Mahapatra, Professor

3.      Dr. S.K. Beura, Assoc. Prof. (CAS)

4.      Dr. A.K.Senapati, Assoc. Prof. (CAS)

5.      Dr. M.K. MISHRA, Assoc. Prof. (CAS)

6.      Dr. (Mrs) G. Biswal, Assoc. Prof. (CAS)

Department of Nematology

       2.  Dr. N. K. Sahoo, Professor & Head

       3.  Dr. D. K. Nayak, Assoc. Professor (CAS)

4.       Dr. B. K. Dash, Assoc. Professor (CAS)

Department  of Seed Science and Technology

1.      Dr. S. K. Mohanty, Professor & Head

2.      Dr. S. K. Swain, Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr. K. C. Muduli, Associate Professor (CAS)

Department of Plant Physiology

1.      Mrs. R.K.Bhol, Asst.Professor

2.       Mr. R.K.Panda, Asst.Professor

Department of Extension Education

1.      Dr. B. Parasar, Prof. & Head

2.      Dr.A.P. Kanungo, Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr.(Mrs.) B. Mishra, Associate Prof. (CAS)

4.      Dr. B. P. Mohapatra, Assoc. Prof. (CAS)

5.      Dr. R.S.Panigrahi, Assoc. Prof. (CAS)

6.      Dr. S.P. Sangramsingh, Assistant Professor

7.      Dr.P.K.Banarji, Assistant Professor

Department of Agricultural Statistics

1.      Dr. A.K.Parida, Professor and Head

Department of Agricultural Economics

1.      Dr. R.K.Mishra, Professor and Head

2.      Dr. A.K.Mishra, Associate Professor (CAS)

3.      Dr. K.K.Sarangi, Assistant Professor